NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC FEATURES MANU NATIONAL PARK IN PERU'S AMAZON

National Geographic’s June 2016 edition features an article on the Manu National Park in Peru’s Amazon, described by UNESCO as the most biodiverse place on earth. It highlights Manu’s extraordinary fauna and flora - spider monkeys, macaws, tapirs, snakes. . . - and some of the challenges faced by some of the people living there, including the Matsigenka, Yine and “Mashco-Piro” in “isolation.” It also highlights some of Manu’s history - far from an “untouched Eden”, actually the site of slave raids and slaughters - and some of the threats facing it and its inhabitants today, including gas operations, logging, mining, roads and conservation. "The Matsigenka’s image of Manú, like their image of nature, includes them," the article reads. "[T]he Matsigenka see themselves as part of the natural order. They hunt monkeys, and so do jaguars. Key plants and animals have spirits and agency, just as people do, and there’s no hard boundary between them." (13-05-2016)

David Hill